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Funds raised for national campaign

It was a friendly battle of red versus white as around 25 people took part in the 2019 Art Hawkins Great Canadian Ultimate Game on June 8.

Held during a break in Ultimate NL’s first Elimin8s tournament, the game saw Team White beat Team Red by a score of 11-9.

The game is an annual nation-wide fundraiser for the Art Hawkins Development Fund, which supports the accessibility and development of ultimate and Spirit of the Game to children, youth and those with disabilities, particularly in economically disadvantaged communities.

Scores from each location are added together to determine an overall winner. Nationally, Team Red defeated Team White 203-186.

Ultimate NL has received two grants from the fund. In 2017, a grant helped start a pilot wheelchair ultimate program, and in 2014, the funds went towards a fall youth ultimate league.

This year, Ultimate NL is contributing the proceeds from its Elimin8s tournament to the fund for a total donation of $290.

Thank you to everyone who participated and played with great spirit and a positive attitude!

Familiar faces at Ultimate Canada table

Five head shots of the current and former players involved with Ultimate Canada at the board and committee levels.
Left to right: Rob Langridge, Tiago Hori, Robyn Auld, Suzy Stever and Natalie O’Donnell.

Past and present representatives from Newfoundland and Labrador are making an impact on the national stage through Ultimate Canada.

Rob Langridge, a familiar face in many leagues in St. John’s, is president of the national governing body for ultimate.

Robyn Auld and Tiago Hori, both former players in local leagues, are at-large members on the board of directors. Auld was one of the founding members of the Newfoundland and Labrador Ultimate Association (now Ultimate Newfoundland and Labrador) and served on the board for Mile Zero Ultimate, as did Hori.

Auld now represents Alberta on the national board and Hori represents Prince Edward Island.

Hori is also part of Ultimate Canada’s spirit of the game committee, where he is joined by former Ultimate NL president Suzy Stever.

Finally, Natalie O’Donnell has been appointed as the Atlantic representative on the national sport development committee.

Congratulations and thank you to all former and current players who are offering their skills and talents to grow the ultimate community across Canada!

Coaching courses being offered in February

Do you love ultimate? Are you interested in expanding your knowledge and introducing the game to others? Become a coach!

Ultimate Newfoundland and Labrador is hosting two free coaching courses in February.

Feb. 2: Community Coaching Course

This one-day course incorporates both classroom and practical learning for participants interested in coaching at a beginner level. For more information and to register, click here.

Feb. 9-10: Competition Introduction Coaching Course

This two-day workshop is aimed at those interested in coaching competitive youth programs or adult development programs. For more information and to register, click here.

Both courses will be held at the College of the North Atlantic on Prince Philip Drive in St. John’s.

There is a $40 registration fee per course that will be refunded upon completion of the course.

Annual charity game aids local food aid non-profit

Nick House, president of Ultimate NL and MAUL (right), poses with Jody Williams, manager of Bridges to Hope, and donations from the annual MAUL/SWURL charity game.

The fourth annual MAUL/SWURL holiday charity game raised $800 and over 400 non-perishable food items for Bridges to Hope.

The St. John’s-based non-profit organization offers several programs aimed at providing food aid assistance to citizens in the Northeast Avalon region. These include a food pantry, community kitchen and community outreach and education.

“This game is a highlight for many players in our leagues,” says Melissa Wheeler, SWURL president. “It’s a great opportunity for our players, as well as players that have returned home for the holidays, to get together and play a game for fun with the intent of giving back to the community. SWURL and MAUL provide the field space free of charge for any players that want to play in our charity games with the caveat that players bring cash or non-perishable food items that we can then bring to Bridges to Hope.”

“Being able to provide such a substantial donation each year is something that our leagues are very proud of, and our players continually impress us with their festive spirit and their generosity for those in need,” she adds.

Participants in the annual MAUL/SWURL holiday charity game.

Forty players from the Men’s Avalon Ultimate League and St. John’s Women’s Ultimate Recreational League took part in the annual tradition, which sees the two leagues challenge each other to raise the most donations from its players. MAUL narrowly won the challenge for the fourth year in a row.

“It’s heartwarming to see generosity of our members at this time of year, just one more example of what makes our community special,” says Nick House, president of MAUL. “We are grateful for their contribution to an important cause.”

The charity game was held on Dec. 20.