In the fall of 2018, ultimate was named a Foundation Sport with School Sports Newfoundland and Labrador (SSNL)This makes the sport of ultimate more accessible to all students in the province.

Our goal is to have more students playing ultimate at varying levels of competitiveness. From intramurals to provincial school tournaments to adult leagues, nationals and even Team Canada, ultimate allows students to dream big. Whether they want to simply have fun or aspire to greater levels of competitiveness, Ultimate NL is here to help students, teachers and coaches achieve their athletic dreams.


What is ultimate?

Since its creation in the late 60s, ultimate has gained worldwide recognition as a fast-paced, low-cost sport that emphasizes sportsmanship through spirit of the game. It’s easy to learn, requires little equipment and can easily be played in any open space.

The basic skills of the game – throwing, catching, running and jumping – make for an easy transition for athletes from other sports, both team and individual.

Ultimate is a self-refereed sport with the onus on each player to ensure that other players and themselves are acting within the rules and abiding by the ideals of fair play and spirit of the game. It’s built on the understanding of respect for all players on the field and that fair play is essential in creating an enjoyable playing experience.

Back to Top

Why play ultimate?

Ultimate is fun, fast-paced and easy to play. All you need is a disc, players and some space!

Back to Top

What does ultimate as a Foundation Sport mean for your school?

Foundation Sport status is the introductory phase of any sport wishing to become part of the SSNL varsity program. It’s used to establish a foundation of interest in the sport on a regional basis and is meant to develop and foster that interest into consistent participation levels. The intent is to help the sport make the transition to Official Sport status with SSNL.

The Foundation Sport version of ultimate pits teams of four against each other. Teams are co-ed, making it accessible to a greater number of students. For smaller schools, this also  provides a greater pool of students from which you can form teams and participate in regional and provincial tournaments.

Back to Top

What is Ultimate Newfoundland and Labrador (Ultimate NL)?

Ultimate NL is the provincial sports organization for ultimate frisbee in Newfoundland and Labrador. A not-for-profit organization that’s governed by a volunteer board of directors, its mandate is to grow the sport of ultimate throughout the province.

Back to Top

What is spirit of the game?

Spirit of the game is at the heart of ultimate and a defining characteristic of the sport. With no referees, ultimate relies on the spirit of the game, placing the onus of sportsmanship and honourable play on the players themselves.

  • Ultimate relies upon a spirit of sportsmanship that places the responsibility for fair play on the player. Highly competitive play is encouraged but never at the expense of mutual respect among competitors, adherence to the agreed upon rules or the basic joy of play. Protection of these vital elements serves to eliminate unsportsmanlike conduct from the ultimate field. Such actions as taunting opposing players, dangerous aggression, belligerent intimidation, intentional infractions or other win-at-all-costs behavior are contrary to the spirit of the game and must be avoided by all players.” USAU 11th Edition Rules, Rule 1.b.

For more information, click here.

Back to Top

Ultimate in Newfoundland and Labrador

In the fall of 2018, ultimate is being introduced as a Foundation Sport with SSNL, enabling students across Newfoundland and Labrador to learn and enjoy the four-on-four format of the game.

Foundation Sport is the introductory phase of any sport wishing to become part of SSNL’s varsity program (see the varsity calendar here). It helps develop interest and skills on a regional basis and generates enough participation for it to become an official sport with SSNL.

Adult leagues are also run year-round in St. John’s and clinics are offered as requested throughout the province. Our leagues include:

Competitive travelling club teams (youth, open, mixed and women’s) have represented the province at many national and regional tournaments for several years. Club teams include:


Where can I find more information/resources?

Back to Top

How can Ultimate NL help me incorporate ultimate into my curricula?

We want to ensure your students love ultimate as much as we do! We’re here to support you. If you have questions or suggestions, email youth@ultimate.ca and we’ll work with you to help you achieve your goals.

We’ll also provide:

  • – equipment (discs and cones);
  • – teaching resources and lesson plans;
  • – coaching and skill development clinics;
  • – funding to attend tournaments;
  • – funding to help to help you develop your project; 
  • – access for students to participate in competitive travelling club teams; and
  • – funding for students to attend national team tryouts.

Ultimate Canada also provides resources for teachers.

Back to Top

How can ultimate help students meet their essential graduation learnings (EGLs) from the curricula?

  • Citizenship: Ultimate is built on the concept of respect for all players and the mutual understanding that fair play is essential in creating an enjoyable playing experience. As a self-refereed sport, the onus is on each individual player to ensure that other players and themselves are acting within the rules and abiding by spirit of the game.
  • Communication: As a self-refereed sport, players are expected to settle disputes in timely manner. It’s important that all parties show respect for each other and act in the best interest of fairness rather than personal gain.
  • Personal development: Ultimate is a fast-paced sport that helps participants develop hand-eye coordination, stamina, explosiveness and overall fitness. Ultimate NL offers several adult and youth leagues as well as tournaments that enable students to pursue ultimate during school and into adulthood at varying levels of competitiveness. Ultimate is often considered a great cross-training sport for those students whose primary interest is in another sport. It also incorporates elements of other popular sports, such as soccer, football and basketball, making it relatively easy for players from other sports to learn.
  • Problem solving: As a team sport, ultimate teams often develop set plays to aid the advancement of the disc towards a more advantageous position or scoring a point. Ultimate players develop a variety of throwing skills that require quick decision-making and physical finesse and competence.
  • Spiritual and moral development: As a central tenet of ultimate, spirit of the game emphasizes respect and fair-mindedness as the cornerstone of creating a fun and engaging environment for all players. A self-refereed sport, spirit of the game states that competitive play should never be at the expense of fair play.

Back to Top

How can ultimate help students achieve specific curriculum outcomes (SCOs) from the curricula?

Incorporating ultimate into course curricula allows students to meet SCOs for physical education in junior and senior high school by completing the following general curriculum outcomes (GCOs) and key specific curriculum outcomes (KSCOs).


Grade 7

Students will:

  • – demonstrate basic stances using the appropriate body mechanics and body awareness concepts such as muscle tension and relaxation and the relationship of body parts while moving (GCO 1; KSCOs 1, 2, 5, 6).
  • – demonstrate efficient court and field activity skills and movements during co-operative and competitive activities (e.g. ready position, passing, sending/receiving, movement with and/or without implement) (GCO 1; KSCOs 1, 2, 3, 5).
  • – demonstrate an understanding of space awareness by experimenting with ways to solve movement problems by applying range and level movement concepts (e.g. when an opponent is close, what do you do to score a point?) (GCO 2; KSCOs 1, 2, 4).
  • – in a co-operative group, determine various ways to be successful during field activities (GCO 2; KSCOs 1, 2, 3, 4).
  • – predict the efficiency of court activity movements by applying any number of the movement concepts of space, quality of movement and body awareness (GCO 2; KSCOs 1, 2, 4).
  • – demonstrate self-responsibility and personal development in court activities as they apply to interscholastic, intramural and community activities (GCO 4; KSCOs 1, 2, 3).
  • – demonstrate fair play concepts within co-operative and competitive activities (i.e. changing partners, rotating courts, keeping score, appropriate comments) (GCO 5; KSCO 3).
  • – participate willingly in non-traditional field activities such as lacrosse, football and field hockey (GCO 6; KSCOs 2, 3, 4, 6).


Grade 8

Students will:

  • – demonstrate improvement in court activity skills (e.g. sending/receiving, movement with or without implement) by applying movement concepts of body awareness (relationship of body parts while moving and body language) and space (direction, range and force) (GCO 1, KSCOs 1, 2, 8).
  • – demonstrate strategies in a variety of cooperative and competitive court activities using movement concepts of levels and body language (GCO 1, KSCOs 2, 3, 5, 6).
  • – participate in interscholastic athletics, intramural programs and/or community based activity programs (GCO 4, KSCOs 1, 2, 3).
  • – show concern and safety for self, others and the environment during activities (i.e. rugby, football, soccer) (GCO 5, KSCOs 1, 2, 3).


Grade 9

Students will:

  • – demonstrate appropriate movement concepts such as level, direction, and body language when throwing and striking in court and field activities (GCO 1, KSCOs 1, 2, 5, 6 ).
  • – demonstrate offensive and defensive strategies to optimize play using movement concepts (GCO 1, KSCOs 3, 5, 6, 8).
  • – demonstrate appropriate warm-up, work-out and cool-down activities in court/field activities (GCO 1, KSCOs 2, 3, 7, 9).
  • – initiate an activity program that reflects the interests of the students and the concepts of fair play (GCO 4, KSCOs 1, 2, 3).


Phys Ed 2100

Students will:

  • – participate in a variety of individual/partner activities (GCO 1; KSCO 1).
  • – apply body movement skills/principles/variables to individual/partner activities to help students enhance their personal skill level and success (GCO 1; KSCO 2).
  • – identify and follow appropriate rules, etiquette and principles of play while engaged in various individual/partner activities (GCO4; KSCOs 1, 2, 3).
  • – demonstrate behaviours such as support, encouragement and praise towards classmates while engaged in a variety of alternative activities (GCO 4; KSCOs 1, 2).
  • – use appropriate strategies in team building and game situations (GCO 1; KSCOs 2, 3, 5).
  • – participate in a variety of games and activities that contribute to personal wellness (GCO 1; KSCO 7).
  • – participate in a variety of games and activities to enhance the skill sets required for personal success (GCO 1; KSCOs 1, 2, 6, 8).
  • – analyze and solve movement tasks and challenges while participating in games/activities and team building (GCO 2; KSCOs 1, 2, 3, 5).
  • – demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively and manage potential conflict with classmates while engaged in games, activities and team building (GCO 4; KSCOs 1, 2, 6).
  • – demonstrate positive behaviours (support, praise, encouragement, appropriate etiquette) and critically reflect upon behaviours while engaged in a variety of games and team building activities (GCO 6, KSCOs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
  • – demonstrate the ability to set meaningful personal goals while participating in various team building activities (GCO 6; KSCOs 6, 7).


Phys Ed 2101

Students will:

  • – continue to participate in a variety of individual/partner activities (GCO 1; KSCOs 1, 3, 4, 5).
  • – further develop and apply body movement principles to individual/partner activities to enhance personal success (GCO 1; KSCOs 2, 7, 8).
  • – participate in a variety of co-operative activities (GCO 1; KSCOs 1, 2).
  • – build upon previously learned skills to participate in a variety of new games and activities and increase the likelihood of personal success (GCO 1; KSCOs 2, 3, 4, 8).
  • – apply team building principles and experience to participation in games and co-operative activities (GCO 1; KSCO 6).
  • – apply principles of team building to traditional games and activities (GCO 1; KSCO 6).
  • – analyze and solve movement tasks and challenges while participating in co-operative games and activities (GCO 2; KSCOs 1, 2).
  • – demonstrate an understanding of appropriate game strategies in both co-operative and traditional games and activities (GCO 2; KSCOs 1, 2, 3).
  • – demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively and manage potential conflict with classmates in both co-operative and traditional games and activities (GCO 2; KSCO 5).
  • – assess personal responses and behaviour to various experiences in co-operative and multicultural games/activities (GCO 3; KSCOs 1, 6).
  • – identify and follow appropriate ground rules and protocols to ensure enjoyable participation in various co-operative and traditional games/activities (GCO 5; KSCO 3).
  • – demonstrate behaviours such as support, encouragement appropriate etiquette and praise towards classmates in a variety of co-operative and traditional activities (GCO 6; KSCOs 2, 3, 4, 5).
  • – demonstrate the ability to set meaningful personal goals while participating in various co-operative games/activities (GCO 6; KSCO 7).


Phys Ed 3100

Students will:

  • – actively participate in activities that develop flexibility and cardiovascular fitness (individually and with a partner) (GCO 1, KSCOs 3, 4, 5, 7).
  • – learn new movement concepts and motor skills and/or apply existing skills in challenging situations (GCO 1, KSCOs 1, 2, 6, 8).
  • – create, lead and actively participate in innovative activities GCO 2, KSCOs 1, 2, 3).
  • – understand and apply rules, etiquette and safety practises in a variety of situations and settings (GCO 3, KSCO 1).
  • – recognize and demonstrate appropriate strategies when participating in games and activities (GCO 2, KSCOs 1, 2, 3).
  • – contribute to the successful completion of team/group games and activities (GCO 3, KSCOs 1, 5)
  • – understand that the contribution of one’s individual strengths and skill sets can enhance the success, enjoyment and self-esteem of fellow students (GCO 6, KSCOs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)


Phys Ed 3101

Students will:

  • – develop and refine movement concepts and motor skills through a variety of individual/partner games and activities (GCO 1, KSCOs 1, 2, 6, 8).
  • – understand, develop and implement appropriate strategies for fitness games and activities (GCO 2, KSCOs 1, 2, 3).
  • – understand and apply rules, etiquettes and safety practices in a variety of fitness games and activities (GCO 3, KSCOs 1, 5).
  • – develop, implement and refine movement concepts and motor skills through participation in a variety of games and activities GCO 1, KSCOs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8).
  • – learn and apply appropriate strategies in team/group games and activities (GCO 2, KSCOs 2, 3, 5; GCO 3, KSCOs 1, 5, 6).
  • – understand and apply rules, etiquette and safety practices in a variety of activities and settings (GCO 2, KSCOs 2, 3, 5; GCO 3, KSCOs 1, 4, 5).
  • – access, evaluate and reflect upon their personal contributions in games and activities (GCO 4, KSCO 1; GCO 6, KSCOs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7).
  • – develop and gain an appreciation for team work and co-operative skills (GCO 4, KSCOs 1, 2; GCO 5, KSCO 3; GCO 6, KSCOs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5).

Back to Top